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Friday, May 8, 2020 | History

2 edition of Harvestmen of the sub-order Laniatores from New Zealand caves found in the catalog.

Harvestmen of the sub-order Laniatores from New Zealand caves

Raymond R. Forster

Harvestmen of the sub-order Laniatores from New Zealand caves

by Raymond R. Forster

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  • 40 Currently reading

Published by Otago Museum Trust Board in Dunedin, N.Z .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Opiliones -- New Zealand.,
  • Arachnida -- New Zealand.

  • Edition Notes

    StatementR.R. Forster.
    SeriesRecords of the Otago Museum -- no. 2
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsQL3 .O8 no. 2
    The Physical Object
    Pagination18 p. :
    Number of Pages18
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL17536321M

      Structure and function of the eyes of two species of opilionid from New Zealand glow-worm caves (Megalopsalis tumida: Palpatores, and Hendea myersi cavernicola: Laniatores). — Proc. Roy. Soc. Lond. B: Biol. Sci. Author: Norton Felipe dos Santos Silva, Kasey Fowler-Finn, Sara Ribeiro Mortara, Rodrigo Hirata Willemart. Cyphophthalmi is a suborder of harvestmen, colloquially known as mite hthalmi comprises 36 genera, and more than two hundred described species. The six families are currently grouped into three infraorders: the Boreophthalmi, Scopulophthalmi, and : Arachnida.

    Introduction. Cave habitats have long interested evolutionary biologists and ecologists – such habitats combine geographic isolation, promoting speciation and endemicity, with selective similarities, promoting convergence in life history and morphological combination of divergence and selective constraints leads to evolutionary trends that are predictable and often replicated Cited by: Structure and function of the eyes of two species of opilionid from New Zealand glow-worm caves and Hendea myersi cavernicola: Laniatores). Zur Embryonalentwicklung der Phalangiiden Some Tasmanian harvestmen of the sub-order Palpatores. Papers and Proceedings of the Royal Society of Tasmania

    Invasion of New Zealand By People, Plants, and Animals: the South Island on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Invasion of New Zealand By People, Plants, and Animals: the South IslandManufacturer: Rutgers University Press. Environment. Subterranean fauna is found worldwide and includes representatives of many animal groups, mostly arthropods and other r, there is a number of vertebrates (such as cavefishes and cave salamanders), although they are less e of the complexity in exploring underground environments, many subterranean species are yet to be discovered and .


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Harvestmen of the sub-order Laniatores from New Zealand caves by Raymond R. Forster Download PDF EPUB FB2

Additional Physical Format: Online version: Forster, Raymond R., New Zealand harvestmen (sub-order Laniatores). Christchurch, N.Z.: Canterbury Museum.

HARVESTMEN OF THE SUB-ORDER LANIATORES FROM NEW ZEALAND CAVES. By Harvestmen of the sub-order Laniatores from New Zealand caves book. Forster. Rec. Otago Muse Zoology, 2, This paper on cave-dwelling harvestmen from New Zea land confines it- self to the sub-order Laniatores, The sub-order Pa Ipatores and the spiders are to be the subject of later reports by the author.

Ten species are re. HARVESTMEN OF THE SUB-ORDER LANIATORES FROM NEW ZEALAND CAVES. By R.R. Forster. Rec. Otaeo Mus. Zoology, 2, 1 — This paper on cave-dwel ling harvestmen from New Zealand confines it- self to the sub-order Laniatores.

The sub-order Palpatores and the spiders are to be the subject of later reports by the author. Ten species are re.

Forster, R.R. () Harvestmen of the sub-order Laniatores from New Zealand Caves, Records of the Otago Museum, Zoology, Dunedin, 2, 1– Taylor, C.K. (b) Further revision of the genus Megalopsalis (Opiliones, Neopilionidae), with the description of.

On four poorly known harvestmen from New Zealand (Arachnida, Opiliones: Cyphophthalmi, Eupnoi, Dyspnoi, Laniatores) Article (PDF Available) in New Zealand Journal of Zoology 41(4) This harvestman spider in Aurora Cave, Fiordland, shows the lack of pigmentation common in subterranean life forms, which have no need of camouflage in the dark.

Cave environments are marginal for many forms of life because of the lack of light (and hence food), but some creatures still manage to eke out an existence. A new book documenting New Zealand's mysterious underworld aims to challenge the public perception of caving. The book, Caves: Exploring New Zealand.

However, the bulk of harvestman biodiversity is situated in the sub-order Laniatores, with about 4, species. These harvestmen, which have their highest numbers in the humid forests and caves of the subtropics and tropics (particularly in South America), tend to look  very  different from their European and U.S.

cousins. The order Opiliones includes three sub-orders, all of which have representatives in the New Zealand fauna: Cyphophthalmi - the mite-like harvestmen - are small ( mm), slow-moving primitive harvestmen which resemble dark, hard-bodied mites.

About thirty species live in the soil and leaf litter of New Zealand forests. The troglobitic harvestmen Megalopsalis tumida and Hendea myersi cavernicola inhabit the Waitomo Caves in New Zealand with their luminescent prey, the glow-worm Arachnocampa luminosa.

Because they were so common in English fields during the harvest, the group has become known as harvestmen. New Zealand has a large number of unique species. They are divided into two groups: the suborder Laniatores (short-legged harvestmen) and the suborder Palpatores (long-legged harvestmen). A multilocus approach to harvestman (Arachnida: Opiliones) phylogeny with emphasis on biogeography and the systematics of Laniatores.

Cladistics, DOI: /jx. Kury A.B. & Alonso-Zarazaga M.A., Addenda and corrigenda to the "Annotated catalogue of the Laniatores of the New World (Arachnida, Opiliones)".

R.R. Forster – Harvestmen of the sub-order Laniatores from New Zealand caves. H.D. Skinner – The Bird -Contending-with Snake as an Art Motive in Oceania.

We investigated the internal phylogeny of Laniatores, the most diverse suborder of Opiliones, using sequence data from 10 molecular loci: 12S rRNA, 16S rRNA, 18S rRNA, 28S rRNA, cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI), cytochrome b, elongation factor-1α, histones H3 and H4, and U2 snRNA.

Exemplars of all previously described families of Laniatores were included, in addition to two families Cited by:   Two new species of harvestman (Opiliones: Neopilionidae: Enantiobuninae) are described from the Waitomo region of the North Island, New Zealand, Forsteropsalis bona sp.

and F. photophaga sp. Both have been collected within caves in the region, where predation on glow-worms Arachnocampa luminosa has been previously recorded for one or both species (misidentified as. These two species studied herein belong to Triaenonychoides H.

Soares,a Chilean endemic harvestmen genus. Up to now Triaenonychoides breviops Mauryand Triaenonychoides cekalovici H. Soares,are the only species currently included in the genus and exhibit an allopatric distribution recorded for IX Region (Araucanía) and VIII Region (Biobío) respectively (Kury, ; Maury Cited by: 4.

Two new species of harvestman (Opiliones: Neopilionidae: Enantiobuninae) are described from the Waitomo region of the North Island, New Zealand, Forsteropsalis bona sp.

and F. photophaga sp. Both have been collected within caves in the region, where predation on glow-worms Arachnocampa luminosa has been previously recorded for one or both species (misidentified as ‘Megalopsalis tumida’).Author: Christopher K. Taylor, Anna Probert. The New Zealand harvestmen (sub-order Laniatores).

Canterbury Museum bulletin, Christchurch, 2: Hickman, V. Some Tasmanian harvestmen of the family Triaenonychidae (sub-order Laniatores). Papers and proceedings of the Royal Society of Tasmania, Hobart Town, Hogg, Henry R. Some New Zealand and Tasmanian Size: 1MB.

Comment: A copy that has been read, but remains in clean condition. All pages are intact, and the cover is intact. The spine may show signs of wear. Pages can include limited notes and highlighting, and the copy can include previous owner : $ Members of the New Zealand Enantiobuninae constitute some of the most charismatic soil arthropods of the archipelago, and a striking example of sexual dimorphism, with nondescript females but colourful males boasting exaggerated chelicerae many times longer than their bodies.

The genera Forsteropsalis and Pantopsalis recently underwent revision, but many questions remained about the validity Cited by: 6.

Read "The evolutionary and biogeographic history of the armoured harvestmen – Laniatores phylogeny based on ten molecular markers, with the description of two new families of Opiliones (Arachnida), Invertebrate Systematics" on DeepDyve, the largest online rental service for scholarly research with thousands of academic publications available at your fingertips.This wiki provides general guidance for New Zealand cave surveyors, about software applications, current projects and surveying resources.

The pages are accessible to all, however documents intended for members only are protected. Finished maps and locations are not available here.

Suggestions for changes to content are welcomed.A new cavernicolous harvestman, Calliuncus labyrinthus sp. n., is described from the Margaret River limestone caves, Western Australia. The genus Calliuncus Roewer is redefined and a key given for males of its six species.